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Wednesday, November 24
 

8:30am NZDT

Conference Registration
Wednesday November 24, 2021 8:30am - 3:30pm NZDT
Commerce Building Foyer

8:45am NZDT

Video Presentations
Due to Covid-19 related travel restrictions, some who had abstracts accepted to present at this conference were unable to attend. We have set up a YouTube channel to include those presenters who elected to record a video presentation in lieu of conference attendance.  

Go here to view that channel.

Irene Ayallo: A critical exploration of the place of ‘religion’ and ‘religious identity’ in social practice with ethnic communities: A case of African background communities

Edgar A Burns & Adam Rajčan: Changes in doctoral study: Assembling evidence on current publishing patterns during enrolment in a sociology PhD

Benjamin Felix Richardson: From Food to Finance: The collapse of local agriculture and the rise of residential capitalism in Northwest Auckland


Genevieve Grava:
Relationality and transnational care among Pinoys in Aotearoa

Tom Kavanagh: Time-out: An autoethnographic exploration of sport, mental health, and lockdowns

Steve Matthewman (Presenter) & Hugh Byrd: Why don’t we “build back better”? The complexities of re-constituting urban form

Allan McEvoy: Teaching colonisation to Pākehā without provoking  backlash: How to break down guilt, doubt, and resistance.

Byron Rangiwai: Māori spirituality and syncretism

Ali Rasheed: The risk of mental wellbeing spiralling downwards for South Asian communities living in New Zealand

A. M. Leal Rodriguez: Decolonising the Critical Study of Men and Masculinities: A Survey of Filipino Masculinities

Kenzi Yee: Insects as food (for who?): A case for ‘doing’ insects differently in Aotearoa New Zealand

Wednesday November 24, 2021 8:45am - Thursday November 25, 2021 3:00pm NZDT
YouTube

9:00am NZDT

Room C1 - Postgraduate Workshop
9:00–9:05am: Welcome and Intro with Roslyn Kerr and Tiina Vares (Conference Co-Chairs)
9:05–10:00am: Career Planning with Susanna Finlay-Smits (AgResearch) and Sarah Edwards (Lincoln University)
10:00–10:05am: Quick cookie break
10:05–11:00am: Publishing with Chamsy el-Ojeili (Victoria University of Wellington)




Wednesday November 24, 2021 9:00am - 11:00am NZDT
C1

11:00am NZDT

Room C1 - Parallel Session One: Identity
Chair: Karen Fagan

11:00am - 11:20am 

WHERE HAVE ALL THE TOMBOYS GONE?
Cassandra Joseph

The word ‘tomboy’ made its English dictionary debut in the 16th century, albeit used on rowdy boys. It was then used to define ‘immodest women’ before being used on ‘boisterous girls’, which remains unchanged to this day. This shift in meaning is symbolic of the adept movement between gender binaries that people who are tomboys take on, which calls for a more contemporary take on what it means to be a tomboy.

This presentation will chart through the concept of tomboyism—an identity often overlooked as a phase. What does it mean to be a tomboy, and is this meaning similar for everyone who identifies as a tomboy? To answer this, the construct of binary genders have to be dismantled as we engage with people from various parts of the world who intimately understand the unique experience of being a tomboy—and how they have shaped this understanding into their current gender identity. The internalisation of the tomboy identity has an undisclosed heaviness attached to it, and it is often a lonely journey through gender identification. Where are the tomboys now, and how are they coping?


11:20am - 11:40am 
IMIGRATION EXPERIENCES OF CHINESE HIGHER EDUCATED “LEFTOVER WOMEN” IN NEW ZEALAND
Yunying Liang

In this research, six semi-structured interviews and one focus group discussion were conducted with six ‘leftover women’ to understand their migration from China to New Zealand. ‘Leftover women’ refers to single women who obtained a good education, stable jobs, and are aged in their late 20s. I explored how the label of ‘leftover women’ influences their decisions and migration experiences, and how their perceptions of identity and gender are constituted and affected by the ongoing reality of gender construction in contemporary New Zealand. A thematic analysis was applied to investigate the topic. Two gender-related themes emerged regarding the complexities of marriage and migration: escapist migration and the ‘let it be’ attitude. Based on the social constructionist framework, I employed Foucault’s power and knowledge analysis to disclose the interrelationship between gender and Chinese patriarchy. Preliminary analysis suggests that ‘leftover women’ are the new and independent generation of contemporary Chinese women, with specific individual pursuits and high expectations towards marriage life; however, they still face constraints due to long-standing unequal relations and attitudes towards women, including language and the patriarchal and gendered power in China; whereas migration is another way they currently could find to dismantle the restrictions on their identity transition.


11:40am - 12:00pm

CHILDBEARING BEHIND BARS: THE EXPERIENCE OF FILIPINO PREGNANT PRISONERS
Romulo Nieva Jr

Many women who enter prison come from the margins of society. They are primarily of childbearing age and mothers. Thus, they have distinct reproductive health needs. Despite an extensive literature on the reproductive wellbeing of marginalised women, the experience of pregnant prisoners is under-researched. This research presents a qualitative interpretation of women's pregnancy experience in the largest Philippine prison. The study was conducted in 2020 and involved semi-structured interviews with 18 pregnant prisoners. This study builds upon existing knowledge and highlights the institutional context of the pregnancy experience of women in prison. Through thematic analysis, the study's key findings are organised into three broad themes: (a) dislocation of identity b) sense of scarcity, c) and feeling of disempowerment. These themes embody the women's narratives of how their pregnancy and motherhood status appeared secondary to their 'prisoner identity', exacerbated by their experience of systemic scarcity and sense of powerlessness in prison. Imprisonment was the fulcrum on which the women's experiences of pregnancy were negotiated and balanced. The study showed how the women navigate the system to negotiate entitlements and deal with their pregnancy needs. This research highlights the gaps in existing policy guidelines and structure to support their reproductive wellbeing needs.

 
12:00pm - 12:20pm
 

SOCIAL IDENTITY, BELONGING, WELLBEING AND TATTOOS
Karen Fagan


Since the 1980’s Aotearoa New Zealand has been experiencing a significant increase in both tā moko and contemporary non-traditional tattoos. This so called ‘tattoo renaissance’ is not unique, although Aotearoa New Zealand is considered one of the most tattooed societies in the world. As a part-time PHD student I am in my fourth year of exploring this phenomenon. Informed by Bauman’s concept of ‘liquid modernity’ my research explores the meanings people give to their non-traditional contemporary tattoos. I am curious about how people are expressing their social identity and sense of belonging through these tattoos within the neo-liberal context of Aotearoa New Zealand. I have just completed collecting my data which involved interviewing people with tattoos and photographing the tattoos they choose to talk about. With my background in Community Work, Social Work, Social Science Research and as an Educator I am well versed in the argument that a clear sense of social identity and belonging can contribute to wellbeing.

In this presentation I will provide a background to my research, share my research design, and touch on some of my preliminary findings.


Speakers

Wednesday November 24, 2021 11:00am - 12:20pm NZDT
C1

11:00am NZDT

Room C2 - Parallel Session One: Urbanism
Chair: Helen Fitt

11:00am - 11:20am 

PLANNING, GOVERNANCE AND A CITY FOR THE FUTURE?
Eric Pawson


It has been argued that New Zealand’s existing governance structures are insufficiently anticipatory in the face of change. This paper explores whether this has been so in the context of post-earthquake urban recovery. It traces links between new governance entities created for the rebuild and antecedent planning processes, and discusses the extent to which these entities, in focusing on specific outcomes, have delivered a coherent or a fragmentary post-earthquake vision. Three aspects of post earthquake urban governance are discussed: the genesis of the Crown’s blueprint for the downtown district, the enabling of rapid expansion of subdivision in greenfield districts in and around the metropolitan area, and the debate over the future of the city’s red zone, those eastern suburbs abandoned in the face of damage from liquefaction. The use of these simple colour-coded metaphors suggests a clarity that is at odds with the complexity of the context, as well as the fragmentary nature of post-earthquake governance when considered as a whole.


11:20am - 11:40am

PRACTISING URBANISM; DE-COLONISATION AND RE-OCCUPATION OF PUBLIC SPACE
Suzanne Vallance

In this paper, I argue for both the de-colonisation and re-occupation of the urban commons that have been occupied, initially the modern state’s penchant for administrative ordering and, subsequently, by the neo-liberal state’s deference to ‘the market’. Neither project has been particularly humane; both have left our public places poorly placed to promote civil society or strong environmental ethics. Before state consolidation, expansion and colonialism, people’s relationships with each other and the ‘natural’ world were of critical importance. Decolonisation, here, speaks to the need to find places in which these relationships can, again, feature prominently in people’s everyday lives. This resonates with our increased appreciation of ideas like manaakitanga, kaitiakitanga and whanaunatanga here in Aotearoa/New Zealand. This de-colonisation, I argue, can be supported by the re-occupation of ‘public’ space, space literally made public through more widespread practices of co-management of urban commons such as streets and parks. The co-management draws on Ostrom’s principles but also involves street science and collective experimentation that upholds the value of shared experiences, hospitality, stewardship, self-determination and subsidiarity.


11:40am - 12:00pm

THE HOUSING CRISIS AND CITIZEN OPPOSITION TO LAND-USE PROPOSALS
Morgan Hamlin

This presentation discusses how citizens effectively politicise proposed housing developments as public issues when they are justified as a solution to the housing crisis. It is based on my recent research on how Justifications Analysis can be utilised to understand the politicisation of land-use proposals in the public sphere (Hamlin, 2021). I focus on a proposal to develop part of the Point England Reserve for housing and the moral orders of worth that underpinned the claims made by supporters and citizen opponents. I explore how citizens effectively critiqued the market-based justifications for the proposal with an anti-privatisation argument. Citizens invoked civic and green justifications to claim that that reserve should be protected for environmental reasons and its recreational significance. Rather than being a form NIMBYism, I discuss how public responses are culturally informed political acts that transform housing proposals, which appear as well-meaning interventions in the housing crisis, into contestable public issues.

 
12:00pm - 12:20pm

MESS OR MASH-UP? ARE PRACTICE ARCHITECTURE, MOBILITY BIOGRAPHY, AND SHARED MOBILITY PIECES OF THE SAME PUZZLE?
Helen Fitt, Angela Curl & Simon Kingham


Shared mobility has potential to improve access and increase wellbeing for low-income populations and older people. Shared mobility involves short term rental or loan of vehicles, and can include cars, bikes, and scooters. Lowering the per-trip costs of transport, increasing the range of transport options to which people have access, and increasing the use of active transport modes should (in theory) reduce the number of people who struggle to access important amenities and social opportunities. There is, however, little international evidence of this happening and minimal discussion of the social processes involved in the emergence of outcomes from shared mobility schemes. The ACTIVATION research project is working with social housing tenants and retirement village residents who have recently gained access to shared mobility. This presentation proposes a novel combination of a practice architecture perspective and a mobility biography method to try to understand how mobility practices are influenced by access to shared mobility. It asks whether assembling these different theoretical, methodological, and empirical elements results in a difficult to disentangle mess, or a productive mash-up that will help us to devise better approaches to shared mobility schemes.


Speakers

Wednesday November 24, 2021 11:00am - 12:20pm NZDT
C2 Commerce Building

11:00am NZDT

Room C5 - Parallel Session One: Sport
Chair: Sally Shaw

11:00am - 11:20am 

SENIOR WOMEN, WELLBEING, ENGAGEMENT AND NON-COMPETITIVE SPORTS: A CASE STUDY OF THE LEISURE MARCHING NATIONALS
Trudie Walters & Richard Wright

In Aotearoa New Zealand, 80 percent of adults (aged 15+) have had experience of mental distress, and data shows this is often linked to feelings of isolation and disconnection. While adolescents (aged 15-19) and older adults (aged 60+) are worst affected, females are more likely to experience a common mental disorder than males, regardless of age.

Aotearoa New Zealand’s Mental Health Foundation works towards creating a society where all people enjoy positive mental health and wellbeing. They partnered with the Health Promotion Agency to launch the Five Ways to Wellbeing toolkit in 2018, consisting of five actions adapted from those first created by the UK’s New Economic Foundation. These actions are designed to improve physical, psychological and sociological wellbeing: Give; Be Active; Keep Learning; Take Notice; and Connect.

We applied the toolkit to a case study analysis of the 2019 New Zealand Leisure Marching Nationals, an annual non-competitive sports event, and offer a rare insight into the clear contribution that even a single annual event can make to the achievement of the Five Ways to Wellbeing. We find that such events may act as a vehicle for active ageing through their contribution to health and wellbeing for senior women.


11:20am - 11:40am 

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FAMILY AND SPORT IN THE SOCIALISATION OF CHILDREN
Aleksandra Stojanovska, Roslyn Kerr & Greg Ryan

This research aims to provide insights into the relationship between family and sport during the process of child socialisation. In line with Berger and Luckmann’s theory of socialisation, the family has long been considered as the agent of primary socialisation, with wider social influences such as sport acting as secondary influencers. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews of fifteen children, aged 10-12, who had been participating in competitive team sports for at least two years, their parents, and thirteen children’s sports coaches. The results identified a range of characteristics that had been developed or extended through sporting participation, some of which were unexpected in comparison with previous literature. For example, all three groups identified the growth in children’s communication skills through playing sport, along with more traditional sporting skills such as teamwork.


11:40am - 12:00pm

WHAT IS THE NAME? “CHINESE TAIPEI” OR “TAIWAN”: THE PARADOX OF SPORTS NATIONALISM IN TAIWAN
Meng-Tyng Hsieh

In 2018, the name rectification referendum was launched in Taiwan. It requested using Taiwan as the name to apply when attending the 2020 Tokyo Olympics in place of Chinese Taipei. The referendum gave rise to a series of debates between Republic of China (ROC/ Chung Hua Ming Kuo) nationalism and Taiwanese nationalism. This study analyses the name rectification referendum coverage and comments on social media platforms. It shows the paradox of two nationalisms. With the Taiwanisation of the ROC, the Chinese Taipei (Chung Hua) team was equated with ROC/ Taiwan, and it was considered as an acceptable name for the ROC by the ROC nationalists and Taiwan as an island's name cannot be represented as a whole country. Counter to this, Taiwanese nationalists argued that Taiwan per se is the synonym of the name of the country. However, both nationalisms excluded China from the imagined community. Additionally, both sides attempt to reach their political ends, seeking recognition from the international community, maintaining the ROC's nationalist symbol, and removing the Chinese political legacy and confronting China's political coercion, through exploiting sport. In the end, because of the risk of being disqualified by the International Olympic Committee, the name rectification referendum was defeated.


12:00pm - 12:20pm 

LGBTQ+ WOMEN’S INCLUSION IN RUGBY IN AOTEAROA/NZ
Sally Shaw

​​​​
Women and gender were a focus of New Zealand Rugby (NZR)’s Respect and Responsibility Review (2016), and are a focus of Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) work in NZ rugby. There is little information, however, about the experiences of women’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, takatāpui, queer/questioning+ (LGBTQ+) communities in rugby in Aotearoa. Anecdotally, for some LGBTQ+ women, rugby is considered to be a more inclusive space than other sports. The purpose of this research is to examine the inclusion experiences of senior (+18 years) members of LGBTQ+ communities, who self-identify as women, and who are involved in NZ rugby as players, coaches, administrators, team managers, and/or match officials. Analysing discursive practices (Baachi & Bonham, 2014), this research seeks to shed light on whether rugby is an inclusive space for LGBTQ+ women in Aotearoa and, if so, why? A mixed-methods, online survey (Braun, 2020) was distributed to female rugby participants using NZR’s database and data analysis is ongoing. Preliminary results will be presented, along with reflections on the use of mixed-method in this context. In the medium to long-term, this research will contribute to the analysis of discursive practices in sport (e.g. Spaaij, 2019) and to NZR’s ongoing D&I objectives.


Speakers
avatar for Sally Shaw

Sally Shaw

Associate Prof, University of Otago
Gender, sexuality, sport organisations.


Wednesday November 24, 2021 11:00am - 12:20pm NZDT
C5

11:00am NZDT

Room C6 - Parallel Session One: Agrifood – Food Systems
Chair: Carolyn Morris

11:00am - 11:20am

THE PERSISTENCE OF RECIPROCAL LABOUR IN RURAL SOUTHEAST ASIA: BEYOND THE DICHOTOMY OF SOLIDARITY VS. MARKET EXCHANGE
Alice Beban


Despite scholars in the 1990s claiming that Southeast Asian peasantry was dead and that reciprocal labour would inevitably disappear in the face of capitalist exchange relations, reciprocal labour practices persist. What are we to make of this? Agricultural economists see in these practices the last vestiges of precapitalist economies that can smooth labour shortages and ensure bare survival, while postcapitalist feminists see the potential for building collective prosperity. In this presentation, I draw upon a large sample of qualitative interviews carried out in Northern Cambodia in 2016 and 2020 to show that exchange labour not only persists; its prevalence and significance within poorer households is increasing. In the face of rapid agricultural commercialisation, debt, ecological crises and gendered inequalities, exchange labour practices help rural families survive and maintain social ties.

Yet, while agrarian studies literature often pits romanticised notions of exchange labour as a form of solidarity against the individualising effects of capitalist wage labour, I find that this dichotomy between sociality/gift vs. market/commodity is increasingly blurred. Exchange labour is not static. In rural Cambodia, the affective labour of exchange is taking on the capitalist logics of efficiency and competition, with implications for who gets included in exchange labour circles and how exchange labour contributes to social solidarity. I explore what these shifting practices might tell us about contemporary experiences of social change, and possibilities for socio-ecologically just futures.


11:20am - 11:40am 
CARING FOOD SYSTEMS? THE TRANSFORMATIVE POTENTIAL OF REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE IN NEW ZEALAND
Madison Seymour & Sean Connelly


A growing body of literature argues that achieving radical change in the agri-food system requires a radical renegotiation of our relationship with the environment alongside a change in our thinking and approach to transformational food politics. To do this, this study investigates the degree to which components of a more-than-human ethic of care are embedded within New Zealand’s emerging regenerative farming movement. The purpose of this research is to understand the potential of regenerative farming to act as political and social spaces for radical and transformative change. The research is based on farm visits and interviews with farmers and key organizational stakeholders who are either practicing or supporting regenerative agriculture in Otago, Southland and Canterbury. It was found that undertaking regenerative agriculture requires a significant shift in mindset away from the reductionist paradigm that dominates conventional farming towards a more holistic and relational understanding of biological and social ecosystems. This shift is characterized by greater attentiveness to on farm biology to guide engagement in on-farm decisions, but these holistic and principle-based perspectives were also being applied to personal and social lives. The mindset shift found to be occurring with many regenerative farmers is what differentiates ‘being regenerative’ from the technical practices of regenerative agriculture. While the two overlap, it is the mindset that is crucial to the transformational potential of regenerative agriculture.


11:40am - 12:00pm 
GROWING FOOD; GROWING COMMUNITY: THE ROLE OF COMMUNITY FOOD INITIATIVES IN ŌTAUTAHI CHRISTCHURCH
Joanna Fountain & Nick Cradock-Henry

The COVID-19 pandemic and phased lockdowns have disrupted the agri-food system in Aotearoa New Zealand, highlighting acute vulnerability, supply chain fragility, and critical dependencies. To reduce future risk, there is now growing interest in regional food security and opportunities to ‘buy local’. There is evidence, too, that pandemic lockdowns have also led many New Zealanders to reassess priorities, with ‘slow food activities’ such as baking and cooking and establishing, or expanding, home vegetable gardens becoming increasingly popular. While these trends reflect a global movement amongst consumers for locally, ethically and sustainably produced food, the pandemic has also highlighted significant issues of food security for many households and communities, where simply having enough nutritious food to feed a family is the immediate priority. This paper reports on qualitative research into five community food ventures in Ōtautahi Christchurch, particularly community gardens and food forests, in the context of COVID-19. Findings reveal that while food is the pivotal element of these ventures, their role in the community is much broader than this. There has also been a shift in roles and priorities for these ventures over time, often precipitated by crises in the city; this has been witnessed during the current pandemic, but was also evident during the 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes, attracting new participants, and reflecting broader changes in values around food, food security, and community.


12:00pm - 12:20pm
 

CULTURAL IMAGINARIES AND SUPPLY CHAIN DISRUPTION IN AOTEAROANZ: THE GREAT FLOUR SHORTAGE OF 2020
Carolyn Morris & Matt Henry


At 11.59pm on March 25, 2020, AotearoaNZ moved into a nation-wide lockdown to halt the spread of COVID19. Supermarkets remained open and while the Government reassured citizens that the food supply was secure, panic buying ensued. Reports of flour shortages first appeared in the media on March 31st. Initially unnecessary panic buying was blamed, but by the following day a supply chain cause was discovered. This turned out not to be a problem with the supply of wheat or with milling capacity, but a problem with the supply of small bags for packaging. The cause of the surge in demand for domestic flour was, the media reported, people’s desire to enact a kind of “traditional” family life through baking cakes and sourdough bread as a way of dealing with the profound disruption to life produced by the lockdown.

Food supply chains can be understood as networks of human and non-human actors assembled to integrate the production, processing and distribution of food. They are fundamentally animated by fantasies of a-cultural, technical, rationality, where goods circulate seamlessly and eternal plentitude is assured. The disruption of supply chains by COVID19 disturbed these fantasies, showing that supply chains are in fact particular to their material and cultural territorialisations. In tracing specificities of the Great Flour Shortage of 2020 we also reflect on disruption as a way of making sense of COVID life, in ways that suggest that imaginaries of logistics profoundly frame our ways of being in the contemporary world.




Wednesday November 24, 2021 11:00am - 12:20pm NZDT
C6

12:30pm NZDT

Lunch - Dining Hall
Supported by the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge ‘Our Seas’ programme

COVID protocols for morning/afternoon teas and lunches

Delegates are required to scan the QR code on entry to The Dining Hall (every time), wear masks, and once inside, ensure they are seated at a table (these are set up for the required distancing protocol). Delegates are not permitted to stand and mingle. Staff will serve platters of the menu items to the tables, and there will be tea/coffee stations set up. Delegates will need to follow instructions of the staff in this regard – tables will be invited up one by one to get their tea/coffee. Physical distancing is also required while lining up for tea/coffee.

If you wish to bring a packed lunch, you are welcome to eat it in the Commerce Building foyer, or there are picnic tables if you prefer to eat outside.

Wednesday November 24, 2021 12:30pm - 1:30pm NZDT
Dining Hall - Lincoln University

1:30pm NZDT

Room C1 - Parallel Session Two: COVID-19
Chair: David Fisher

1:30pm - 1:50pm

ADDRESSING THE PANDEMIC: VACCINE IMPERIALISM VS GLOBAL SOLIDARITY
Josephine Varghese


In October 2020, India & South Africa introduced a proposal at the World Trade Organization (WTO) to temporarily waive intellectual property rules on Covid-19 vaccines and associated medical supplies. The aim of the proposal was to release vital medical research and technology for generic production so that the supply and cost issues that particularly affect developing nations could be systemically addressed. The proposal, although supported by most developing nations, was opposed by a small yet powerful group of rich nations including USA, UK, Germany, and France. In response, the People’s Vaccine movement took shape which has been mobilizing support to push through the proposed waiver. The movement generated enough pressure to effect a partial shift in the US position in May 2021. USA, followed by many other nations including New Zealand currently support waiving patent laws on vaccines, but not all aspects of the proposed waiver. However, others, most vocally the EU, remain fully opposed. Liberal political establishments in the west can be identified as the main gatekeepers of the interests of pharmaceutical corporations at the WTO. In this talk, I present a critical analysis of the response of western governments to the people’s vaccine movement with a focus on New Zealand, arguing for the creation of global governance frameworks that uphold solidarity.


1:50pm - 2:10pm
BUT HOW DO WE LEAD IF THEY WON’T OPEN THEIR CAMERAS? TERTIARY LEADERS AND STAFF WELL-BEING DURING PERIODS OF COVID-19 LOCKDOWN
Richard Smith


Much has been written globally about the effects of COVID-19 in tertiary education and the need to deliver lectures and materials in online modes. These mostly take the form of the effects on students as well as staff and their unpreparedness from both perspectives. Unlike the vast array of literature that falls into those important categories, fewer studies have been conducted on the experiences of middle leaders in higher education organisations (such as heads of departments or programmes) who have responsibilities both for the well-being of the students and their pastoral care duties, as well as making sure their staff are cared for appropriately and checking on general well-being. What of the leaders themselves, who cares for them? This paper provides the background scoping and critical literature review for a proposed research project on this topic to be undertaken in 2022. We propose an online survey through SurveyMonkey to all heads of schools or programmes that have education specific qualifications from certificate to doctoral level. This is a project that has the buy in of the majority of the Aotearoa New Zealand universities and the ITP and Wānanga sectors. A number of these organisations will be partners in the research too. The central premise of this research is how prepared were leaders and their staff to deliver materials online and at short notice with a global pandemic? What was the correct balance and boundaries between caring and being intrusive? And what if staff and students refused to open their cameras?


2:10pm - 2:30pm

TOURISM RESEARCH BY WORD OF MOUSE. CHALLENGES IN THE FACE OF COVID-19
David Fisher, Jia Geng, Thuan Huynh, Kiko Qin, Pasang Sherpa, Becky Smiley, Supaporn Supaponlakit, Pradeep Tennakoon & Zhong Ni


2020 ushered in new challenges for research students. This paper analyses how tourism research for postgraduate degrees has had to change as a result of the pandemic. International restrictions on travel, for both the researchers and the subjects of research has meant that many proposed theses have had to be radically revised.

Adaptations and strategic changes made to planned research proposals have depended on where in the research process individual students where when Covid 19 was declared a pandemic. For some students the inability to travel occurred before they began their fieldwork. For others their fieldwork was interrupted. If the researcher had hoped to interview international tourists those tourists were no longer travelling. The need for remote interviewing meant that research questions had to be altered because those initially set could not be answered. Respondents who had no access to internet technology could not be interviewed. In some cases, real time research was impossible, so a more historic approach had to be undertaken. This changed the way in which results could be interpreted. Additional considerations have been the ethical issues inherent in interviewing respondents online using commercial software.

Nevertheless, whilst this process has been stressful new opportunities have arisen.


Speakers
avatar for Jia Geng

Jia Geng

PhD candidate, Lincoln University
I am a third-year PhD student at Lincoln University. The current research field is risk perception and decision making. I am interested in dynamic risk perception, decision-making patterns, and the impact of the online environment in decision making.
avatar for Richard Smith

Richard Smith

Principal Lecturer, Toi Ohomai
Richard Smith Is currently a Principal Lecturer in the School of Education at Toi Ohomai in Rotorua a role he has held since May 2021. JHe was briefly an Associate Professor FREEDOM Institute of Higher Education in Hamilton, January to May 2020 but unfortunately lost his job due to... Read More →


Wednesday November 24, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm NZDT
C1

1:30pm NZDT

Room C2 - Parallel Session Two: Identity & Exclusion
Chair: Megan Apse

MY LIFE AS DATA: AN AUTO-ETHNOGRAPHICAL ACCOUNT OF RACISM AND ANXIETY
Byron Williams

In life, there are moments that spark intense reflection. I was recently sent an article from stuff.co.nz: ‘Like Bodies, Like Minds: Musician TJ Zimba links his depression to racism at school’. The title stared at me, challenging me, urging reflection of my racialized experiences. The provocative title encouraged me to think in a social-scientific fashion I have personally tried to avoid, perhaps to spare myself pain. Much of my academic research has been motivated by my experiences, but rarely was it ever of my experiences. Could it be? Could my experiences of racism in New Zealand schooling have played a role in my anxiety throughout adulthood? In this presentation, I reflect on this question. I draw on the parallels between the aforementioned article and my life through the use of autoethnography. I analyse my own experiences, bolstered on top of experiences of other young Africans around me, and argue experiences of racism in New Zealand create destructive patterns of mental health and feelings of inadequacy. Drawing on select works of Frantz Fanon and Bell Hooks, I will demonstrate how these experiences are part of a long-running theme of existing in African skin in a Euro-dominated world.


QUALITATIVE CRYSTALLISATION: A CASE OF SRI LANKAN BUDDHIST NUNS
Gihani De Silva

Buddhist nuns in Sri Lanka strive and thrive under a system that excludes them in certain respects. It required a holistic methodological approach to the study of the lives of Buddhist nuns’ groups (or the survival strategies), whose places in Buddhism and the monastic community are not settled or singular. Given the intricacies of the Buddhist female renunciation phenomenon in Sri Lanka, I was impelled to use a new metaphor to characterise the process through the empirical data gathering and analysis for this study: crystallisation. This study discusses the peculiarity of the crystallisation metaphor, which offers a methodical way to alternate and encounter the above-mentioned representation crisis. Crystallisation provided a framework for describing and incorporating the diverse forms of discourse representations I observed in the field, ranging from performances and embodied actions to sophisticated multimedia presentations and state-sanctioned festivals of Buddhist nuns. Crystallisation incorporates these disparate genres and representations of female renunciation while also allowing different modes of collecting (including artistic inquiry: poetry, preaching performance) and analysing data. The ultimate goal is to embrace marginalised and historically silenced groups like Buddhist nuns in Sri Lanka. As a result, a crystallised account was produced, which was subsequently incorporated into a cohesive text.


WELFARE SANCTIONS IN AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND
Megan Apse & Clarie Gray

Welfare systems in the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand are increasingly using sanctions as a tool to promote compliance with welfare conditions. Although research has shown that sanctions may be ineffective in influencing behavioural change, New Zealand welfare recipients routinely face the threat of sanctions as part of Work and Income procedure. Penalties can reduce payments to beneficiaries by up to fifty per cent and result in financial hardship with a myriad of negative flow-on effects. This mixed-methods research examined the experiences of welfare recipients whose benefits had been sanctioned. Findings suggest that welfare recipients face financial hardship and high stress levels when under sanction, the effects of which erode mental and physical health. In addition, the research found that processes leading to sanctions were not well understood by benefit recipients. The research contributes to a growing body of New Zealand literature suggesting that the relationship between Work and Income New Zealand and its clients has become increasingly punitive.


Wednesday November 24, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm NZDT
C2 Commerce Building

1:30pm NZDT

Room C3 - Parallel Session Two: Climate Change & Environment
Chair: Casimir McGregor

1:30pm - 1:50pm

CLIMATE, CAPITAL, AND COMMON SENSE – HOW HEGEMONY INHIBITS A COLLECTIVE RESPONSE
Thomas Smith


The recent IPCC report on climate change and global warming irrefutably states the role of humanity in the warming of the planet, but in doing so it has also obfuscated the role of the capitalist mode of production in both exacerbating and prolonging the crisis. The framing of human influence on climate change, though not incorrect in itself, stems from an embedded common sense around capitalist hegemony relative to the unfolding climate crisis. If we are to make a meaningful response to the crisis, we must understand both the role of capitalism in causing the crisis and the way in which capitalist hegemony maintains a narrative stating otherwise. This narrative relies on constructing a common sense which places the blame and responsibility for the crisis on the individual in order to continue short term profitability at the expense of the planet. To begin resisting this individualisation, analysis of historical movements against capitalist exploitation can offer us insights into the underlying crises of both capitalism and climate in the present through the lens of hegemony. This lens can begin to make visible a path toward escaping climate catastrophe.


1:50pm - 2:10pm
TANIWHA, TŪREHU, AITANGA-A-NUKU-MAI-TORE AND OTHER THINGS THAT GO BUMP IN THE NIGHT
Lloyd Carpenter


Māori have mythical creatures in cultural narratives, in creation myths and in their relationship with their natural environment. Some are monsters to be feared who steal lives or souls, others are supernatural, idealised elfin folk, while a few are kaitiaki (guardians) of resources and culture. In this presentation I will discuss Taniwha, Tūrehu, Aitanga-a-nuku-mai-tore and other things that go bump in the (Māori) night, outlining their function in terms of tikanga (cultural mores) and their place in te ao mauri (the spiritual realm) and te ao Māori.


2:10pm - 2:30pm

PUBLIC UNDERSTANDING OF ENERGY PERFORMANCE CERTIFICATES IN AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND: A PRACTICED-BASED ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOURS AND COMMUNICATION IN THE TRANSITION TO ZERO CARBON
Casimir MacGregor, Max Nicholls & Roman Jaques

This paper outlines public –especially consumer– understandings of Energy Performance Certificates for use in New Zealand residential buildings. Energy Performance Certificates (EPC) have become an important element in energy and climate change mitigation within the built environment. EPCs are an important policy tool, as they provide a way to enhance the energy performance of buildings. EPCs also serve as an information tool for building owners, occupants and real estate actors. Further, EPCs are an important market tool that can create more demand for energy efficiency in buildings. Drawing upon qualitative interviews were undertaken in Christchurch and Wellington and insights from the ‘ecologies of practices ‘(Kemmis et al, 2014) and science and technology studies (STS). The paper seeks to provide insight into consumer knowledge and awareness regarding energy efficiency and conservation and gain their thoughts on an EPCs scheme. Key questions were centred around the nature and usefulness of EPCs, explored via the use of a comparative example, and their thoughts on the implementation of a potential EPC scheme in Aotearoa New Zealand. The research suggests that self-management of energy use was an important aspect of consumer energy practice that allowed for greater empowerment and control over their energy use. The majority of consumers focused on their energy practices as the main way they sought to save electricity. Despite high energy literacy and awareness about the issue, there were many ‘environmental externalities’ that made energy efficiency and conservation practices challenging.


Wednesday November 24, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm NZDT
C3

1:30pm NZDT

Room C5 - Parallel Session Two: Food & Wine
Chair: Heidi McLeod

1:30pm - 1:50pm
‘85% PURE?’ – THE GI FICTIONS AND OUTRIGHT LIES OF WINE AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND
Peter Howland

In 2017 the Geographical Indicators (Wine and Spirits) Registration Act came into force. This act dictates that locally produced wines must ascribe to the 85% rule with regard to grape’ variety, vintage and geographical origin (e.g. Sauvignon Blanc, 2021, Marlborough). Geographical Indicators (GIs) are modelled on the wine appellations of France, Italy and Spain, and are designed to generate value by assuring consumers of the place-of-origin and production integrity of wine.
I argue that GIs are a form of legal fiction - or more cynically, a form of legislated lying. Firstly, the threshold of 15% of different and unspecified grape variety, wine vintage and region of production is hardly insignificant, especially in wines that are vintage (e.g. Sauvignon Blanc) or variety (e.g. Pinot Noir) sensitive. Secondly, and perhaps most importantly, as ‘truth claims’ – based predominantly on the seemingly fixed geological, varietal and temporal ‘facts’ of terroir – the 85% true/15% not true dialectic creates another moral space whereby playing fast and loose with the notion of appellation-orientated wines is deemed both ethically and commercially warranted. This is evident in the legal creation of wholly fictitious vineyards and wine estates that are now a significant component of New Zealand produced wine.


1:50pm - 2:10pm

LITTLE IS BIG: HOW LITTLE ACTIONS MAKE SMALL IMPACTS AND BIG RIPPLES, THE TARANAKI LONG LUNCH
Heidi McLeod


Sharing the story of the Long Lunch from a research project on small-scale, regenerative food growing in Taranaki:
  • An ethnographic, embodied description of the drama of having 100 people for lunch. Personal musings on the funding/research deliverable of a workshop to support active participatory research into regenerative food systems.
  • Mixing food, people, Māoridom, and academia – a multi-disciplinary stage with a wide audience. Collaborative processes for shared knowledges and learnings.
  • Imaginings and reimaginings – What were my aspirations for this event, what did I want it to deliver? Celebration, reflection, and engagement. What I planned, what worked, what didn’t.
  • Ripples and coagulation – what happened after? What does it mean for the research? Momentum of event for participants. What does it mean for regenerative food systems? What does it mean for Taranaki?
  • Pleased to meet you – relationships in research, movement building, corporates and academia. How a grower was subsequently asked to showcase their produce, organic development of relations and synergies, creating an environment and context of connection and cohesion – what I do, helps you?! Who came and who didn’t come?

2:10pm - 2:30pm
‘BUYING LOCAL’ IN POST-PANDEMIC AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND
Joanna Fountain


The Aotearoa New Zealand economy is facing unprecedented challenges from the COVID-19 pandemic sweeping the world, and is causing severe disruption to the primary sector. For exporters, supply chain delays and increased shipping costs are impacting cash flow and profitability and causing logistical challenges. For smaller primary producers reliant on domestic distribution, restrictions to the hospitality, tourism and event sectors has left many questioning their future viability. These smaller producers will rely on strong domestic support for their financial recovery. Early indications and broader trends suggest there is reason for optimism. Over the past two decades, global trends in food and drink consumption have seen small scale, local and ‘authentic’ food products prioritised by many consumers. Media reports, market research and anecdotal evidence suggest that the pandemic has intensified this ‘buy local’ trend, as consumers seek to support the economy at a time of crisis, but has also highlighted significant food security concerns for many New Zealanders. Informed by academic literature, media commentary and recent research, this paper outlines three consumption trends apparent during the pandemic – framed as “Getting back to basics”, “Valuing local and locals” and “Focusing on well-being” – and considers what role ‘buying local’ could have in ensuring more resilient – and equitable – food futures in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Speakers
PH

Peter Howland

Senior Lecturer, Sociology, MASSEY UNIVERSITY
Dr Peter J. HowlandSenior Lecturer in Sociology, Massey University, New Zealandp.j.howland@massey.ac.nzOricd: 0000-0002-3742-0004Dr Peter J. Howland is a former tabloid journalist by mistake, an anthropologist by training, a sociologist by occupation, and a neo-Marxist by moral and analytical compulsion. He has long-standing research interests in wine production, consumption and tou... Read More →
avatar for Heidi McLeod

Heidi McLeod

MA Student Human Geography, Massey University
I study Human Geography at Massey University, where I am completing my Master’s thesis on small-scale food growers.  I’ve channelled my personal foodie interests into understanding food regimes, commodity chains, systems and practices that bind up the way the world grows, exchanges... Read More →


Wednesday November 24, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm NZDT
C5

1:30pm NZDT

Room C6 - Parallel Session Two: Agrifood STS
Chair: Chris Rosin

1:30pm - 1:50pm

ASSEMBLING THE TEAM OF 5 MILLION: SOCIO-TECHNICAL RELATIONS IN AOTEAROA-NEW ZEALAND’S BIOSECURITY SYSTEM
Sarah Edwards


Aotearoa-New Zealand’s “team of 5 million” is frequently mobilised to defend the nation’s borders from the biological threats posed by pests, pathogens and weeds. While this need for a team approach has been central to the recent Covid-19 pandemic response, it has been evident in biosecurity policy for some years, as exemplified by the Biosecurity 2025 strategy: Ko Tātou/This is us. But in addition to the ongoing focus on people, there is an ever-increasing array of technologies that are being developed to meet biosecurity goals. Through an examination of the National Animal Identification and Tracing (NAIT) scheme, I will conceptualise Aotearoa-New Zealand’s “team of 5 million” as an assemblage of social and technical elements. In doing so I will also consider how biosecure borders do not simply exist at the periphery of the nation state, but are made and remade at sites within the its


1:50pm - 2:10pm
PERCEPTIONS AND ACCEPTABILITY OF NANOTECHNOLOGY IN THE NEW ZEALAND WINE INDUSTRY
Nikolai Siimes


This Masters project investigates current perceptions on nanotechnology use by various actors connected to the production, marketing, and sale of wine. Nanotechnologies potentially offer an improvement to conventional vineyard inputs, with overseas examples being developed in plant nutrition and pest and disease management. Despite these promises, their acceptability by a variety of key actors involved in the social construction and material production of wine in New Zealand is uncertain. One concern is for the reputation of New Zealand wine through an association with nanotechnology. There are questions about how global nanotechnological developments might enter New Zealand practices, and what this means for, for example, understandings of terroir. This project seeks to understand the technical and market acceptability of these nanotechnological solutions to a range of ‘wine production problems’ by elucidating the downstream perception and acceptability of their use. Perceptions and attitudes of New Zealand wine producers, viticulturists, marketers, wine writers, sommeliers, and retailers (as ‘market makers’) are gathered through semi-structured interviews, and their perceptions and attitudes examined with respect to stakeholder type, region, and market share as well as contextualised in an international setting. This research is a work in progress, and I will report on recent findings.


2:10pm - 2:30pm

TEMPORALITY OF DATA AND THE PURSUIT OF QUALITY: THE LIVELINESS OF DRY MATTER IN THE KIWIFRUIT SECTOR
Chris Rosin, Matthew Henry & Sarah Edwards


Considering data as a participant in the agro-environmental everyday, we apply the concepts of infrastructing, performativity and ferality to the measurement of dry matter as an indicator of quality in the kiwifruit sector. While desirable in international markets, New Zealand kiwifruit faced complaints from East Asian markets about the inconsistent flavour of its gold variety. Known for differentiating fruit to meet distinct market preferences, the sector quickly determined that the dry matter percentage of fruit was a good indicator of its taste qualities. The data generated by drying a random sample from an orchard was established as an objective measure of fruit quality; as noted elsewhere, however, this data is no neutral intermediary. The disruptive potential of dry matter was firmly established in 2020, when the laboratory conducting dry matter assessments stopped providing the service. Finding alternative means of disaggregating fruit for high-value markets exposed the social, economic, political and environmental possibilities that the data both enabled and foreclosed. In this paper temporality and data act as entry points to examine the infrastructuring of kiwifruit provisioning, the performativity of orchard practice and the ferality of data as it alters the social, economic and environmental relations in the sector.


Wednesday November 24, 2021 1:30pm - 2:30pm NZDT
C6

2:30pm NZDT

Afternoon Tea - Dining Hall
Sponsored by University of Canterbury School of Language, Social and Political Sciences

COVID protocols for morning/afternoon teas and lunches

Delegates are required to scan the QR code on entry to The Dining Hall (every time), wear masks, and once inside, ensure they are seated at a table (these are set up for the required distancing protocol). Delegates are not permitted to stand and mingle. Staff will serve platters of the menu items to the tables, and there will be tea/coffee stations set up. Delegates will need to follow instructions of the staff in this regard – tables will be invited up one by one to get their tea/coffee. Physical distancing is also required while lining up for tea/coffee.

If you wish to bring a packed lunch, you are welcome to eat it in the Commerce Building foyer, or there are picnic tables if you prefer to eat outside.


Wednesday November 24, 2021 2:30pm - 3:00pm NZDT
Dining Hall - Lincoln University

3:00pm NZDT

Room C1 - Keynote: Dr Stefanie Rixecker
Chair: Associate Professor Roslyn Kerr
Sponsored by University of Canterbury School of Language, Social and Political Sciences

Dr Stefanie Rixecker is the current CEO of Environment Canterbury, and formerly Deputy Vice-Chancellor and an academic staff member in the area of Public Policy and Administration at Lincoln University. Her research has focused upon the intersection of environmental policy and social justice, including in the areas of future and near-future technologies, climate change and climate justice, marine environments, the geopolitics of energy and gender. She has undertaken projects for community groups, NGOs, UNEP and multiple national and regional organisations, and was awarded one of Amnesty International's most prestigious accolades, the Dove Award, in 2010 for her work as Board Chair of Amnesty International NZ.


Wednesday November 24, 2021 3:00pm - 3:45pm NZDT
C1

3:45pm NZDT

SAANZ Awards: Presentation & Announcement
  • Presentation of a SAANZ Exceptional Service Award
  • Announcement of the 2021 Best Student Abstract winners

Presentations will be made by SAANZ Executive Member Tiina Vares.

Speakers

Wednesday November 24, 2021 3:45pm - 4:00pm NZDT
C1

4:30pm NZDT

 
Thursday, November 25
 

8:30am NZDT

Conference Registration
Thursday November 25, 2021 8:30am - 2:30pm NZDT
Commerce Building Foyer

9:30am NZDT

Room C1 - Parallel Session Three: Wellbeing
Chair: Gaylene Denfood-Wood

9:30am - 9:50am

BEYOND SEN – HOW CONCEPTUALISING PERSONHOOD AS INTERDEPENDENT PROVIDES A PATHWAY TO PERSONAL & PLANETARY WELLBEING
Kevin Moore & Lin Roberts

In the context of development, Sen has argued that central to human wellbeing is that individual persons have the capabilities to live a life that they value. While Sen acknowledges that there are cultural and social processes that influence the values manifest by persons, his approach has been criticised for over-emphasising the independent individual and seeing capabilities as possessions of those individuals. Critics have suggested that a more relational understanding of persons as being constituted collectively, by and in relation to their communities and cultures and the natural world that nurtures them, would enable us to better understand the foundations of personal wellbeing, and open the potential for a healthier relationship with the planet.

In that context, we present a theoretical account of persons that highlights this relationality and so exposes problematic aspects of Sen’s approach. In particular, we consider the foundational nature of the concept of ‘persons’. Within this account, persons and their achievements are constituted by multi-level processes that include the social, cultural and environmental factors that contribute to overall wellbeing. We consider the practical policy implications for people and nature of adopting this account of persons and contrast it to Sen’s capability account.


9:50am - 10:10am 

BUILDER-CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS: A PRACTICE-BASED ANALYSIS OF COMMUNICATION BETWEEN BUILDERS AND CLIENTS DURING THE NEW BUILD PROCESS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR WELLBEING
Orin Lockyer & Kate Bryson

Anecdotally, the builder-client relationship has been a source of tension and stress for builders and clients. Previous research at BRANZ has identified that new build clients often report that their builders perform poorly when it comes to communication. However, we do not know to the extent in which both clients and builders feel their wellbeing, especially mental health has been impacted by poor communication practice. Drawing on the results of a mixed methods study on the builder client relationship in New Zealand, this paper applies insights from the sociology of consumption (Warde, Ritzer) and practice theory (Schatzki, Shove, Kemmis), to help understand the practice of communication during the build process and why it can sometimes lead to adverse mental health outcomes. Findings show that half of builders who experienced client disagreements reported moderate to high levels of depression symptoms. An even great number reported symptoms of anxiety. As clients become more knowledgeable and shift into a more active role on site, it can challenge long-standing practices of construction. This changing consumer practice, unless carefully managed, can lead to conflict during the build process. This paper seeks to help the building and construction industry identify best practice solutions for communication with clients during the build process and contributes to wider sociological discussions on practice theory.


10:10am - 10:30am 

DO ‘PERSONS’ HAVE A PLACE IN PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORY? THE EXAMPLE OF THE PSYCHOLOGY OF WELLBEING
Kevin Moore

The concept of the ‘person’ has struggled to gain traction in psychological theory. While, on the margins, theories of personhood have been developed, the person rarely features as an explicit construct in the most widely adopted psychological accounts of human behaviour and experience.

Despite this near-absence of a focus on persons, I argue that recent empirical and theoretical developments from a wide range of areas including cognitive neuroscience, psychology of the self, cognitive evolution, consciousness, psychometrics and perception can best be understood through incorporation of ‘persons’ into psychological theorising. I then provide a philosophically-grounded theoretical account of persons and personhood as the basis for a reinterpretation of the nature of psychological phenomena and experience.

Importantly, a shift towards a psychology of persons explicitly embeds psychological phenomena in the broader social, cultural and material world both as regards their emergence and sustainability. I illustrate the advantages of such an embedded psychological perspective through considering what the outlines of a person-based theory of wellbeing would add to our understanding of the relational nature of wellbeing and its constitutive interdependencies with the social, cultural and environmental worlds.

Finally, I draw some broad conclusions about the prospects for a person-based social psychology.


10:30am - 10:50am 

SOCIOPOETIC WELLBEING IN A COVID WORLD
Gaylene Denford-Wood


Can the practice of a sociopoetic form sustain wellbeing? What is the evidence? A 2019 doctoral award for A heuristic inquiry with teachers and leaders uncovers a poetry path to wellbeing evoked a broader-based enquiry. A series of workshops followed across diverse social settings, over an eighteen-month timeframe with a cross-section of participants who continued to engage with the process through covid-lockdowns. The researcher sought to understand what, if anything, was the effect of regular practice of this particular poetic form called the mindfulness of seminaria. Using a mixed methods approach, this qualitative study examined the responses of 30 men and women aged 15-75, to adopting this poetic form as a reflexive practice. Though introduced to its theoretical construct, they were encouraged, in practice, to explore it in playful ways to suit their personal and professional needs. Possible applications included: recording events, processing feelings, problem solving, ‘bookending’ the day, planning ahead. The mindfulness of seminaria was found to be surprisingly creative, energising and grounding. Key benefits were the wellbeing components: meaningfulness and self-realisation. Clear evidence emerged of the versatility, vitality and potential of this sociopoetic practice for attaining subjective wellbeing—a factor in participants’ positive adjustment to living in ‘Covid-times’.



Speakers
avatar for Gaylene Denford-Wood

Gaylene Denford-Wood

Student, The School of Creativity and Art
I am developing creative ways to make my doctoral research in the workshops I run, more accessible, user-friendly and fun.
LR

Lin Roberts

Lincoln University


Thursday November 25, 2021 9:30am - 10:50am NZDT
C1

9:30am NZDT

Room C2 - Parallel Session Three: Disaster
Chair: Trudi Cameron

9:30am - 9:50am

EXPLORING DISASTER RESILIENCE DISCOURSE IN NEOLIBERAL SRI LANKA: A SOCIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS BASED ON THE EXPERIENCE OF GOVERNMENT, DONORS AND FLOOD-AFFECTED PEOPLE
H. Unnathi S.Samaraweera

Disaster resilience has become a buzzword incorporated in every Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) document irrespective of its practical outcome in Sri Lanka. This paper explores ‘disaster resilience’ as a discourse in neoliberal Sri Lanka, specifically focusing on the experiences of Sri Lankan policy makers and government actors, donors and flood-affected people in two flood-affected communities. Using a mixed methods approach, the paper draws on face to face household surveys, interviews, and focus group discussions with flood-affected people, semi-structured interviews with various officials, and DRR related documentary analysis. Research findings suggest the Sri Lankan government’s accountability is to create and implement DRR policies and frameworks, to deliver post disaster recovery and reconstruction. The donors’ responsibility is to operationalize disaster resilience at local levels with empowerment being an overall part of their objectives. However, both the government and donor sector initiate response-oriented rapid interventions during and post disaster contexts which indicate lack of coordination in relation to aid delivery. Flood-affected communities do not receive the empowerment and effective disaster recovery envisaged through government and donor support over the short or longer term. Thus, disaster resilience discourse in the Sri Lankan context shift responsibility in relation to disaster resilience towards flood affected subjects.


9:50am - 10:10am 

 MINUTES OF SHAKING: YEARS OF LITIGATION
Jeremy Finn & Elizabeth Toomey

This paper discusses the major long-term legal issues arising from the Canterbury earthquakes and
the frequently unsatisfactory procedures that were supposed to resolve them. The overwhelming effect of the earthquakes’ aftermath led to complexity, failure and unacceptable delays. The poorly prepared Earthquake Commission (EQC) was engulfed quickly with numerous complaints. This led to litigation through the courts, litigation notable for delays in achieving clear court rulings on a number of key issues and the unfortunate channelling of many cases through a single law firm. Eventually both central and local government stepped in to provide dispute resolution services but these were much too late. These cumulative matters cost Canterbury residents far more than they should have in terms of health and money. The recent introduction, more than ten years after the first earthquake, of the Insurance (Prompt Settlement of Claims for Uninhabitable Residential Property) Bill speaks for itself. The paper concludes on a positive note, describing the efficient and collaborative relationship between Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) and the Christchurch City Council (CCC) in dealing with the configuration of the vast tracts of red-zoned land which, in years to come, should bring smiles to the faces of weary Cantabrians. 


10:10am - 10:30am 

MAKING SOCIAL CHOICES IN TURBULENT TIMES: REFLECTIONS ON A DECADE OF DISASTER EXPERIENCES IN ŌTAUTAHI
Bruce Glavovic

Critical Disaster Studies (CDS) are foundational for understanding how to reduce vulnerability. Navigating waves of disaster depends on how social choices are made in the midst disasters. Ōtautahi disaster experiences from 2010 to 2020 testify to the dire consequences of governance practices that close down opportunities for authentic public engagement, deliberation and reflexivity. This presentation distils insights from a forthcoming book by Uekusa et al., on these experiences. I map bright and dark spots in the social choices made through the decade. The central lesson learned is the imperative to open up opportunities for local communities to make social choices with the support of governing authorities. A critical praxis of disaster governance has a strong ethical foundation and is geared towards averting dangerous climate change, environmental destruction, and confronting inequitable and unjust development in a Covid world. It is founded on visionary thinking, inclusivity and robust deliberation, underpinned by public trust and legitimacy. It fosters reflexivity and adaptative capacity. It unlocks agonistic potential to leverage divergent perspectives for the common good and confronts the drivers and root causes of vulnerability. It is human-scaled, embraces diversity and difference, and celebrates the human spirit.


10:30am - 10:50am 

TURN AND FACE THE STRANGE: REFLECTIONS ON CREATIVITY FOLLOWING THE CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKE SEQUENCE
Trudi Cameron


Creativity has been discussed in relation to disaster recovery as a component of resilience (Metzl & Morrell, 2008; Metzl, 2009), entrepreneurship (Chamlee-Wright & Storr, 2010; Monllor & Murphy, 2017) and improvisation (Wachtendorf, 2004). However, this chapter draws on research completed in the wake of the Canterbury earthquakes about how individuals, creativity and social processes intersected in the post-disaster setting. In the immediate and mid-term recovery period, creative ideas were lauded as a saviour of sorts for both their novelty and utility. This drew attention in part because Christchurch was widely regarded as a conservative, traditional city, fond of a heritage well-protected by its stakeholders. The physical destabilising of Christchurch led to a social destabilisation and greater questioning of the application of neoliberal principles that appeared widely-viewed as a socio-political norm (Cloke & Conradson, 2018). This allowed others – particularly those who appeared preadapted to instability – to provide adaptive and creative solutions that were, at least initially, well-supported. This chapter discusses what personally and contextually enabled or hindered those prepared to implement beneficial creative ideas after the disaster. The discussion expands on the findings and resulting models to consider the importance of recalling the value of embracing unconventional ideas in order to courageously do so in non-disaster periods.

Speakers

Thursday November 25, 2021 9:30am - 10:50am NZDT
C2 Commerce Building

9:30am NZDT

Room C3 - Parallel Session Three: Tourism
Chair: Emma Stewart

9:30am - 9:50am
WHAT IS LEARNING IN CHINESE BACKPACKERS’ WORLD TRAVEL?
Ni Zhong

Long-term travel abroad is becoming more common for Chinese people. This type of travel has been seen as a journey of self where the outcome and benefit of travel are a result of learning. However, there is a disparity in how travelers perceive their learning. Little attention has been paid to learning that occurs in the long-term backpacking context and that attention had been limited to western tourists. In order to address the gap this paper investigates the meaning of learning for long-term Chinese backpackers. Fifty-five in-depth interviews in-person and online were conducted in 2020. The result shows that Chinese backpackers understand learning as learning about the world and self, experiencing life, and growth. They emphasized that learning in backpacking is different from learning in school, which is a process rather than a result. It is self-direct, interested based and also affected by the environment. The learning experience is essential in the travel experience. This paper can contribute to new insight into the nature of learning and backpacking and their relationship. It also further explains the meaning of learning about the self and world, which may provide implications for enhancing tourist learning.


9:50am - 10:10am 

WHY DON’T TOURISTS VISIT WHERE THEY WOULD MOST LIKE TO GO? THE CASE OF CHINESE TOURISTS TO NEW ZEALAND
Jia Geng, Kevin Moore and David Fisher


Recent years have witnessed a surge of interest among social scientists in preference (in)consistency in behavioural-decision theories. Tourists, in particular, are confronted with numerous options, especially in the current digital and global context, and their preferences in destination selection change over time. Destination selection is a negotiated process that involves two aspects of choice: desirability and feasibility. This makes the investigation of preference change, the overall choice process and the reasoning behind it of great interest. In
depth interviews of potential Chinese outbound travellers who ultimately decided to travel to New Zealand in the following twelve months were conducted to explore the process of how those tourists eventually decided upon New Zealand. Surprisingly, it was found that most tourists switched initial, more desirable destination alternatives to feasible alternatives (i.e., New Zealand). That is, they failed to choose the place they would like to go most. We considered reasons why they failed to do so. These findings challenge a fundamental assumption that people are able to make choices in their own best interests. In addition, the data also reveal Australia's role as a destination which, counterintuitively, has acted as a major driver for Chinese outbound tourists choosing New Zealand as a destination.


10:10am - 10:30am 

AUTHENTICATING TRADITIONAL FOOD TOURISM ATTRACTIONS IN SUZHOU, CHINA
Denian Cheng, Joanna Fountain, Chris Rosin & Sharon Lucock

There is a call to focus on the nuanced social, political, and cultural process of authenticating tourist attractions. This research looks beyond authenticity perceptions and responds to Cohen's and Cohen's (2012) call for substantiation of their "cool" and "hot" authentication propositions by discussing politically and culturally informed authentication of traditional food tourism attractions. Specifically, this paper aims to examine the authentication process of conventional restaurants in Suzhou, China, from the perspective of owners and managers. It used semi-structured interviews and participant observation to collect research data, subsequently analysed to identify key themes. The analysis reveals that restaurant interviewees authenticated their food products and restaurant settings in two ways. The first authentication strategy is to apply for official certification of the establishment as a "Time-honoured Brand", emphasising that the restaurant is an "authentic" supplier based on a claim to heritage. The second strategy saw the construction of the "authentic" by stating the geographical setting of restaurants, traditional food, exterior and interior decorations, and host-guest interactions. This research also finds that the two authentication strategies seem to be borne from divergent motivations. While the emphasis on a strategy of official certification is economic benefits, their focus on complementary elements is primarily motivated by nostalgic returns.

 
10:30am - 10:50am 

AUTHENTICATION AND (DIS)EMPOWERMENT IN ETHNIC DANCE COMMODIFICATION: PERSPECTIVES OF ECO-MIGRANTS
Xiaozhen Ye, Joanna Fountain & Emma Stewart


This paper focuses on the relationship between tourism development and dance commodification from the perspective of ‘ecological migrants’ in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau of China. Deprived of their homeland and traditional way of life, ecological migrants have been resettled in the region since 2003, and this study has explored the role and characteristics of ethnic dance in this cultural relocation. Special attention has been given to the role of ‘authenticity’ in the eco-migrants’ experience. Based on 35 in-depth interviews with ecological migrants and other stakeholders, the research reveals that dance participants interpret authenticity through engagement in their performances, with this concept having many dimensions. These perceptions are shaped by the role of dance to their livelihood and to their level of empowerment or disempowerment, so that the ways of authenticating dance culture reflects the respondents’ (dis)empowered economic, social, psychological and political status. This paper will outline the relationship between authentication and empowerment status amongst ecological migrant dancers, and illustrate how power status impacts their interpretations of authenticity. The study also provides an insightful overview of the mechanism of (dis)empowerment within ethnic tourism of China, especially within a transitional and disempowered peripheral context.

Speakers
avatar for Jia Geng

Jia Geng

PhD candidate, Lincoln University
I am a third-year PhD student at Lincoln University. The current research field is risk perception and decision making. I am interested in dynamic risk perception, decision-making patterns, and the impact of the online environment in decision making.


Thursday November 25, 2021 9:30am - 10:50am NZDT
C3

9:30am NZDT

Room C5 - Parallel Session Three: Agrifood – Robots
Chair: Karly Burch

9:30am - 9:50am
PRACTICING ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY IN THE DESIGN AND ADOPTION AI AND ROBOTIC TECHNOLOGIES
Angella Ndaka

Artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics research has gained global momentum, with many powerful economic and state actors promoting ‘smart technology’ as ‘the solution’ to major global problems like climate change, food security, poverty, and conflict. However, without critical sociological interventions, these technologies often (re)produce the very social and environmental problems they are being designed to solve. An emerging body of research highlights the carbon-intensive nature of AI and robotic design processes, their dependency on non-renewable mineral resources, and waste produced in their design, use and disposal phases. While most AI and robotic technologies are referred to as ‘green’, and may help in addressing issues related to environmental sustainability, there are gaps in how this might be realised in practice. Drawing on Jasanoff’s conceptualisations of sociotechnical imaginaries and Haraway’s studies on situated knowledge, this study will explore how environmental sustainability is imagined and practiced by a variety of actors who regulate, design, or use agricultural technologies. Situated within the Aotearoa New Zealand-based MaaraTech Project, the study will weave together insights shared by technology regulators, designers, and users to provide recommendations on how to transform sustainability imaginaries about new agricultural technologies into sustainability practices which have positive environmental and social outcomes.


9:50am - 10:10am
PACIFIC MIGRANT LABOUR MEETS ARTIFICIALLY INTELLIGENT AGTECH: COLLABORATIVELY SHAPING EQUITABLE TRANSITIONS TOWARD MORE AUTOMATED VINEYARDS AND ORCHARDS IN AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND
Sandhiya Gounder and Karly Burch

Labour is often described as a “pinch point” for Aotearoa New Zealand’s viticulture and horticulture industries, with migrant labour from Pacific countries and new agricultural technologies (AgTech) expected to fulfil the industries’ intensive seasonal labour needs. Aotearoa’s Recognised Seasonal Employment (RSE) scheme was put in place in 2007 to support vineyard and orchard owners to secure seasonal migrant workers from the Pacific. The scheme has also provided valuable opportunities for Pacific people to profit economically, allowing them to earn a high income abroad without having to permanently migrate to another country. Artificially intelligent (AI) agricultural technologies (AgTech) are also being developed to alleviate the dependence on human labour, or to support human workers in completing seasonal tasks on vineyards on orchards. While new AgTech offers visions of vineyards and orchards with little dependency on human labour, they are still in their infancy stage, and will require many years before they will provide dependable labour support on vineyards and orchards. In this transforming labour landscape where human labour will still be necessary for the foreseeable future, we centre the humans who are taking on the bulk of seasonal tasks on Aotearoa’s vineyards and orchards: Pacific RSE workers. Our inquiry is based on a literature review conducted within the MaaraTech Project—a transdisciplinary collaborative design (co-design) project developing robotic and human-assist technologies with AI capabilities for Aotearoa’s vineyards and orchards. Our paper will highlight some of the reasons why Pacific people are drawn to the RSE scheme, and how understanding the needs of RSE workers might contribute to shaping an equitable transition toward more automated vineyards and orchards in Aotearoa.


10:10am - 10:30am 

ROBOT ONTOLOGIES: KNOWING PLANTS, VINEYARDS AND ORCHARDS THROUGH SENSORS AND CODE
Karly Burch and Katharine Legun


Robotics with artificial intelligence capacities are currently being developed for complex tasks in agriculture, although many are at an experimental stage and have yet to reach commercial viability. At this early development stage, the design of technologies can be seen at their most elemental stage, where they set the infrastructure for potential sophisticated iterations of AgTech in the future. Drawing from interviews with engineers and computer scientists on a large co-design project, this paper will explore the translation of complex agricultural tasks into AI robotics. We pay particular attention to the materialities of these technologies and the capacities they make possible—e.g., the abilities to construct sensation, to move, to make decisions, to learn. By attending to the components that go into developing robotics, and how engineers describe their abilities and networked interactions, we aim to better explicate how a robot can see, think, and act. While these robotics are often modeled from humans, they are fundamentally distinct. Better explicating robot ontologies can help us to clarify the social and environmental dynamics of their development, while also allowing us to tease apart the differences between the imaginaries and realities they produce.



Thursday November 25, 2021 9:30am - 10:50am NZDT
C5

9:30am NZDT

Room C6 - Parallel Session Three: Agrifood – History & Governance
Chair: Alison Loveridge

9:30am - 9:50am
REFLECTIONS ON THE POST-COLONIAL TURN IN AUSTRALASIAN AGRIFOOD STUDIES
Hugh Campbell

The 2018 and 2019 meetings of the Agrifood Research Network saw a significant rise in theoretical discussion of the relevance of post-colonial theorising in agrifood studies in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand. This paper reflects on how this theoretical turn is challenging some orthodox theoretical frameworks in Agrifood research and how we might develop new ways to think about Agrifood research in colonised landscapes. One pathway forward is to re-centre the colonial farm as an agent of agricultural colonisation. The colonial farm provides one possible locus where a nexus of human and more than human agencies formed to create particularly powerful cluster of economic, political and ontological colonising effects. The paper concludes by briefly looking at the example of one colonial farm from the 1850s and how it reveals the multiple lines of collaboration and fracture that were enacted at the farming frontier in Aotearoa New Zealand.


9:50am - 10:10am 

SCIENCE, GENDER AND THE STATE: AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE BULLETINS AND NEW ZEALAND FARMING IN THE MID-20TH CENTURY
Sophie Dix

Recent agrifood conferences have begun to explore the way that agricultural science contributed to the elaboration of High Modernity in places like New Zealand in the 20th century. My honours dissertation has considered how a particular kind of agricultural science text – the farmer bulletins of the NZ Journal of Agriculture – both contributed to empowering the High Modernist state, but also had wider social effects that are less anticipated by scholars of modernity. Starting with James C. Scott, my dissertation explored the standardisation and legitimisation of agricultural science as a governing strategy of the state. But in applying a discourse analysis to these agricultural textbooks, both visible and invisible gendering and racial marginalisation is apparent. Donna Haraway’s theory of situated knowledges was used to further help examine and explore the inherent gendering embedded into science claims and texts claiming to provide objective knowledge about farming. I conclude by arguing that agricultural science texts were both generating particular discourses about modernity and science, as well as linking science, rationality and farming to an extremely gendered world which strongly empowered (white) men and entirely marginalised women and Maori as being relevant to the elaboration of a rational and scientific farming world.


10:10am - 10:30am 

CLASS IN RURAL NEW ZEALAND
Ann Pomeroy

A preliminary exploration of an under-researched topic, class divisions in rural New Zealand, points to major inequalities that are highly likely to be affecting the life chances of some rural residents.
Alongside a literature scan, census and socio-economic deprivation data for the rural component of 20 of New Zealand’s territorial authorities show there is considerable variation between the three rural settlement types (open-countryside outside centres of 300+ people, small centres 300-999 people, and minor-urban areas 1,000 – 10,000 people). A neo-Weberian three-class structure based on Eric Olin Wright’s typology developed for the USA, is used to explain the clear inequalities between these settlement types.

This analysis shows that while geographic location may constrain, or facilitate, the life chances and access to services and material possessions of New Zealand’s rural population in general, social distinctions such as ethnicity and gender, and class divisions emanating from ownership of productive property, also influence rural people’s life-chances and well-being.


10:30am - 10:50am 

NEW ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE AND MEDIA SURVEILLANCE
Alison Loveridge


In the New Zealand farming/environment interface, a traditional command and control system administered by regional government using resource consents and other surveillance tools exists alongside individualised responses such as on-farm environment plans. Over the past two decades, monitoring of resource consents for discharge of dairy effluent shows improved compliance with effluent rules by individuals alongside declining water quality in the face of intensification of farming. Government policy depends on farm environmental plans, audited by certified consultants, to show how set limits for environmental indicators will be achieved, and result in improved water quality in the future. Because these farm environmental plans are confidential, oversight of compliance with resource consents by activists and media is likely to remain a crucial form of citizen surveillance. Scrutinising lists of resource consent infringers nationally enables “naming and shaming” of prominent offenders, but is this effective? While the farm plan will provide regional councils with more sophisticated data on farm management practices, use of these plans may close down the possibilities of understanding these nuances for external players reliant on open access data. A case study of Canterbury compliance data and its mobilisation by activists highlights these ethical and organizational problems.



Speakers
avatar for Sophie Dix

Sophie Dix

Student, University of Otago
avatar for Alison Loveridge

Alison Loveridge

Lecturer
AgriFood


Thursday November 25, 2021 9:30am - 10:50am NZDT
C6

10:50am NZDT

Morning Tea - Dining Hall
Sponsored by BRANZ

COVID protocols for morning/afternoon teas and lunches

Delegates are required to scan the QR code on entry to The Dining Hall (every time), wear masks, and once inside, ensure they are seated at a table (these are set up for the required distancing protocol). Delegates are not permitted to stand and mingle. Staff will serve platters of the menu items to the tables, and there will be tea/coffee stations set up. Delegates will need to follow instructions of the staff in this regard – tables will be invited up one by one to get their tea/coffee. Physical distancing is also required while lining up for tea/coffee.

If you wish to bring a packed lunch, you are welcome to eat it in the Commerce Building foyer, or there are picnic tables if you prefer to eat outside.


Thursday November 25, 2021 10:50am - 11:25am NZDT
Dining Hall - Lincoln University

11:20am NZDT

Room C1 - Parallel Session Four: Death
Chair: Jacky Bowring

11:20am - 11:40am

DEATH, EDUCATION, AND RITE OF PASSAGE: THE POWERFUL ROLE OF THE HIDDEN AND INFORMAL CURRICULUM IN TEACHING ANATOMY USING DONATED HUMAN BODIES IN HEALTH PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMMES
Jon Cornwall & Sylvia English


The student experience of learning anatomy in the dissection room during health professional training is the most powerful and transformative education experience of any pre-clinical training, due to its subject nature, rules, boundaries, and expectations. Despite the extant role in anatomy and health professional education that the dissection room occupies, what is less clear is whether this environment and the ‘rite-of-passage’ it signifies could be further utilised to gain benefits for students in their professional development journey.

This work explores a novel perspective on the education of health professional training through their interaction with death in the dissection room, exploring the experience of professional development in this context through pedagogical, sociological, and ethical lenses. It focuses on exploring the role of the hidden and informal curriculum in shaping professional development and identity, highlighting the fact that transformational benefits via rite-of-passage are perhaps not contextualised or maximised for students.

The corollary from this exploration supports the theoretical argument that the boundaries of this liminal phase could be explored pedagogically to further enhance professional development and identity, with this space offering many opportunities to deliver contextual, relevant educational opportunities that capitalise on the transformation that students experience.


11:40am - 12:00pm

DO AOTEAROA NEW ZEALANDERS WANT THEIR HEALTH RECORDS USED AFTER THEY DIE?
Sylvia English & Jon Cornwall  


As people die, posthumous electronic healthcare records and data (PHCD) are increasing in volume. Despite their potential utility, no publicly-generated information exists to guide what uses society may view as acceptable. Using focus groups, we explored the attitudes and perceptions of Aotearoa New Zealanders to PHCD utilisation. This included topics such as family access, consent models, system infrastructure, anonymity, governance, and commercialisation, using general thematic analysis to explore themes.

Sixty-seven people participated (12 focus groups, average 50 minutes), with dominant themes of beneficence, altruism, and usefulness throughout data. Participants indicated conditional support for a centralised, government-managed PHCD repository allowing controlled, no-cost access for healthcare and research purposes. Commercialisation from data-use was viewed as likely and acceptable, with participants prioritising any downstream benefit being preferentially directed to family, then Aoteaoroa New Zealanders, then others. Māori PHCD was considered preferably managed by Māori. Participants struggled around defining appropriate levels of family access, anonymity, and consent models.

This study provides the evidence of social license for PHCD utilisation, providing guidance for establishing trustworthy data governance and highlighting positive traits that exist in Aotearoa New Zealanders. Further exploration of the topic is necessary to guide how PHCD can be utilised in Aotearoa New Zealand.


12:00pm - 12:20pm
SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH ADVERSITY? THE IMPACT OF THE EARTHQUAKE ON THE GREENING OF DEATH
Ruth McManus


My presentation explores ways in which new meanings and practices of sustainability through adversity are considered in and through the on-going shifts in the socio-political positioning of the dead. It charts and interrogate the constitution and emplotment of the dead pre, during and post disaster as a vein through which broader themes of socio-ecological sustainability are getting re-though and re-worked post-disaster. From the pre-disaster offloading of rural church yards to council care to public debates about the ‘white chairs’ memorials and ground-breaking quarry based sustainable disposal projects, a shift to unfamiliar and potentially progressive modes of recuperative community connectivity and engagement becomes imaginable but sadly unactionable due to the hegemonic consequences of centralised efficiencies within a neo-liberal environment.


12:20pm - 12:40pm 

ON THE ERECTION OF STATUES: QUESTIONS ABOUT MEMORIALS AND GENDER
Jacky Bowring


Recent Black Lives Matter protests highlighted the symbolic potency of statues. But as much as statues can be problematic in what they memorialise, the absence of statues also speaks volumes. The gender statue gap is enormous. Discounting statues to royalty or mythical figures, only 13% of statues in the UK and 7% in the USA memorialise women. A quick glance around Christchurch shows the same pattern, with many dead white males on podiums, but only the Kate Sheppard memorial recognises the contributions of women. Groups around the world are seeking to rectify the disparity, including inVISIBLEwomen and the Public Statues and Sculptures Association, who call for nominations of women to be represented in statues.
But is achieving equal representation in statues the answer to inequity? This paper seeks to explore beyond the aspiration for equity, and critiques the very nature of statues as masculinist in their ethos and their form. This critique suggests that rather than seeking equal representation, the challenge is instead to develop forms of expression that more effectively convey women’s achievements. Rather than calls for more women on podiums, a shift towards meaningful design expression could include the creation of inclusive spaces rather than exclusive objects.

Speakers
avatar for Jon Cornwall

Jon Cornwall

Senior Lecturer and Education Adviser, University of Otago
Educational theory and death studies!


Thursday November 25, 2021 11:20am - 12:40pm NZDT
C1

11:20am NZDT

Room C2 - Parallel Session Four: Disaster Resilience & Volunteering
Chair: Rosemary Du Plessis

11:20am - 11:40am

RECOGNISING VOLUNTEERS; RECOGNISING VOLUNTEERING
Sally Carlton & Sylvia Nissen


Recognition is not necessarily part of volunteering, or it can be expressed informally through ad hoc practices of the giving and receiving of acknowledgement. Yet increasingly, layering over these interactions are formalised performances of recognition through the rise of awards, rewards, distinctions or credit for service. There is a politics of recognition to navigate with the rise of these practices – of what or whom is recognised, by whom, and how? Drawing on 28 in-depth interviews, we examine how young people engaged in volunteering-related activities in Canterbury interpret and navigate recognition for their engagement. In tracing their multiple, conflicting perspectives, our analysis highlights the distinction between interviewees’ profound unease with practices that give recognition to individual volunteers, and their support for recognition of volunteering as a collective act.


11:40am - 12:00pm
FINDING THE “SELF” THROUGH VOLUNTEER TOURISM ACTIVITY IN CHIANG MAI, THAILAND
Supaporn Supaponlakit


The number of research studies of Volunteer Tourism (VT) or Voluntourism has increased significantly over the last twelve years. However, research on volunteer tourism in Chiang Mai, Thailand remains limited despite its popularity as a volunteer tourism destination. Further, VT incorporates characteristics that distinguish it from other forms of leisure travel including the forms of motivation that generate it and the potential impacts it has on the tourist. In this context, the current study explores the relationship between VT activities and self-identity in Chiang Mai, Thailand.
This qualitative study found that volunteers challenged the perceptions of what they felt that they could do through new experiences. Comparative deprivation was accepted because of approval from recipients and the opportunity to learn about different cultures. This is the opportunity to step outside of their comfort zone. As a result, some participants learned more about themselves and had life-changing experiences, which made them gain a better or at least different sense of themselves or of their identity. Nevertheless, it was also found that volunteers often assumed the role of the tourist on their days off and therefore engaged in touristic activities for relaxation and sensation-seeking.


12:00pm - 12:20pm
EARTHQUAKE PRONE COUNCIL BUILDINGS: BALANCING SAFETY RISKS, WELLBEING AND COMMUNITY COSTS
Michael Nuth

The Canterbury earthquakes have heightened awareness of New Zealand’s vulnerability to seismic hazards. Consequently, territorial authorities across New Zealand are increasingly categorising some council-owned buildings as ‘earthquake-prone’. This has led to long periods where facilities and services housed in council buildings become unavailable to local communities, resulting in some notable socioeconomic impacts. For example, closure of Naenae Olympic Pool in Lower Hutt created a sense of uncertainty in the community and led to the closure of some local businesses. The closure of the Wellington Central Library due to structural concerns with the library’s floor seating has also had a significant community impact, including on Wellington’s homeless population. Such examples demonstrate that the wellbeing of communities is often interwoven with the bricks and mortar of council assets. Decisions by territorial authorities to pre-emptively close council buildings while determinations about their operational future are still being made can therefore cause disruption to community life.

It is uncertain how councils, acting as public building owners, are evaluating life safety risks associated with a seismic event within a vast geological timeframe (i.e., thousands of years) alongside the immediate socioeconomic impacts of public building closure. This research seeks to understand how the immediate socioeconomic impacts of public building closure are currently being, or could be better, balanced against the possible physical and human impacts of an earthquake.


12:20pm - 12:40pm 
“MAKING THE MOST OF NOW” YOUNG WOMEN’S STORIES ABOUT UNCERTAIN TIMES
Louise Tapper & Rosemary Du Plessis


Ōtautahi Christchurch has experienced a series of crises that have challenged its residents. A city still impacted by the Canterbury quakes of 2010-2011, was rocked in a different way by the mosque shootings on 15 March 2019. More recently the COVID-19 pandemic has posed different challenges. In August 2020 we embarked on a small-scale oral history project that focused on recording the experiences of thirteen young women who had lived through the aftermath of the quakes, the mosque shootings and COVID-19 related lockdowns. We were interested in their stories and potential connections across their reflections on these different collective, but personally experienced, crises. Participants’ input into the project challenged us to explore how other young women and wider community groups could access the stories they told. We reflect on our research process and our attempts to share these narratives via a digital archive (UC QuakeStudies), online podcasts (Plains FM), and a set of short videos that highlight young women’s strategies for living through “hard times.”

Speakers
MN

Michael Nuth

Social Scientist, BRANZ
avatar for Rosemary Du Plessis

Rosemary Du Plessis

Assoc Professor, University of Canterbury


Thursday November 25, 2021 11:20am - 12:40pm NZDT
C2 Commerce Building

11:20am NZDT

Room C5 - Parallel Session Four: Critiques of Business & Hard Science
Chair: Roslyn Kerr

11:40am - 12:00pm
GENERATING DELIBERATE AND MEANINGFUL IMPACT FROM BUSINESS EVENTS IN NEW ZEALAND: GOING BEYOND THE ECONOMIC
Trudie Walters


The economic value of business events is well-known – delegates spend more per day than leisure visitors, may stay longer than the duration of the event, and return to holiday with family or friends. However, attention has more recently turned to the social value of business events. Research has found that conference attendance, for example, has consequences for career progression and research collaboration. Friendships formed at business events contribute to improved well-being, retention of staff in the profession, and more creativity and innovation in the sector. There is increasing interest amongst the events industry in how to create more social value, but this area is largely overlooked within academia.

This presentation shares insights from the Tourism New Zealand Conference Impact Aotearoa (CIA) programme, designed to generate deliberate and meaningful impact from business events hosted in New Zealand. The programme seeks to extend past the traditional economic perspective on ‘value’ and seeks to maximise the value of business event delegates across the other three pillars of well-being: social, cultural and natural. The presentation reports on my experiences of working with four conferences in the CIA programme to deliver impact beyond the economic and contribute to engagement, well-being and sustainability in New Zealand.


12:00pm - 12:20pm
WHEN I WENT ‘WOW’: WAYS OF SEEING AND ROUTES INTO THE HOMEOPATHIC PROFESSION
Kevin Dew & Monika Clark-Grill


Homeopathy, along with many other alternative therapies, has come under severe attack from apologists for orthodox medicine. Given the cultural authority of medicine, what then provides the impetus for people to take up homeopathy as a clinical practice? This paper addresses this question in the context of homeopathic practice in New Zealand. Five focus groups were conducted with 22 homeopaths in five cities. The study found that participants were not drawn to homeopathy by its philosophy, but through witnessing in themselves, their family, friends, or animals, the positive effects of homeopathy, commonly after negligible success from conventional medicine. For many participants, all of whom were women, the opportunity to study homeopathy occurred when they were the primary carers of children, with homeopathy providing a possibility for a change in work trajectories. Many participants had previous occupations inside the conventional health system. Central to the appeal of homeopathy as a subaltern practice in New Zealand is the often dramatic impact of witnessing the effects of the therapeutic modality, which is conceptualised as analogous to an ‘event’ that tears at the fabric of the everyday.


12:20pm - 12:40pm 

THE PHENOMENON SIMONE BILES: COMBINING SOCIAL, MENTAL, AND PHYSICAL ATHLETIC SUCCESS
Roslyn Kerr & Natalie Barker- Ruchti


There is increasing awareness of the abusive culture that dominates high performance sport and the severe detrimental effects it can have on athlete wellbeing. Linked to this concern is a lack of understanding of the social factors that contribute to athletic performance, with the majority of research concerning high performance success being dominated by the physical sciences. In this study, we aim to improve our understanding of the social conditions that produce both athlete wellbeing and high performance success through focusing on the most successful gymnast of all time: Simone Biles. Anecdotal evidence suggests Biles has experienced a very different pathway from many high performance athletes in terms of her coach’s style of coaching and the social relationships Biles was able to cultivate. Further, as her performance at the Tokyo Olympic Games suggests, she has been able to develop an independent self, which among others, allowed her to prioritise her wellbeing. This presentation will introduce preliminary results of a case study examination of Simone Biles as an example of how high performance sport might be performed more sustainably.


Thursday November 25, 2021 11:20am - 12:40pm NZDT
C5

11:20am NZDT

Room C6 - Parallel Session Four: Agrifood – Disruptive Tech
Chair: Matthew Henry

11:20am - 11:40am
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE AGRO-FOOD SYSTEM AND CULTURED PROTEIN DEVELOPMENTS
Rob Burton


Researchers using the multi-level perspective (MLP) of socio-technological transition have suggested that the cultured animal proteins (e.g. lab meat) are a niche product within the agro-food system that could rise to challenge the existing food regime. The image presented by the MLP is very much one of plucky little innovative niche actors banding together to overthrow a decadent and bloated regime. This paper investigates whether this is actually the case. Using YouTube videos and media interviews with CEOs and CSOs of the cultured protein start-up companies, the paper explores the developing cultured protein sector and its relationship with the agro-food system. The analysis suggests that rather than challenging the regime, the development of the industry is increasingly occurring in partnership with key (but not all) regime actors. Further, it is not landscape level pressures that appear to be creating gaps in the regime, but internal tensions within industrial agriculture at the regime level. The niche for the new product (cultured animal protein) is being created largely by the size and complexity of the locked-in agro-food system. Current regime actors stand waiting to gain from any transition.


11:40am - 12:00pm

UNDERSTANDING HISTORICAL DISRUPTIONS TO AGRIFOOD SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF ARTIFICIAL FIBRES AND THE NEW ZEALAND WOOL INDUSTRY
Niall Kemnitz Campbell, Hugh Campbell and Rob Burton


The emergence of potentially large-scale industrial production of synthetic proteins is just the latest in a long history of new technologies which have created massive disruption to estabished agrifood sectors. In order to understand the potential impact of synthetic proteins to global agrifood systems, several case studies of prior historical disruptions have been undertaken (as part of the Norway-based Protein 2.0 research programme). This paper presents the results of one of those historical cases: the impact on the New Zealand wool industry of the arrival of artificial fibres. The paper will briefly review the longer history of the development of artificial fibres, and then describe the way in which the New Zealand wool industry did and didn’t respond to this external threat. Three main industry discourses are identified as being prevalent in wool industry discussions in the mid-20th century New Zealand. None were sufficient to prevent a major crisis and diminution of the industry’s status and markets.


12:00pm - 12:20pm

HOW WILL NEW AGRICULTURAL TECHNOLOGIES AFFECT EVERYDAY AGRICULTURAL WORK? THE CASE OF A VR-TRAINING TOOL FOR USE IN VINEYARDS IN AOTEAROA NEW ZEALAND
Mira O’Connor and Karly Burch


This research will explore the possible effects of new agricultural technologies (agritech) on the future of agricultural work in Aotearoa New Zealand’s viticulture industry, with a particular focus on the work of pruning winegrape vines. Agritech vary in shape and capability, and different technologies might affect agricultural work in different ways. This makes technology-specific studies of great importance when trying to understand how everyday work might be transformed by the introduction of a particular new agritech. The technology of interest in this study is a virtual reality (VR) training tool being designed by the MaaraTech Project—a multi-university, New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE)-funded trans-disciplinary project collaboratively designing (co-designing) robotic and human assist technologies with artificially intelligent (AI) capabilities for use in high-value fruit industries in Aotearoa New Zealand. Through bringing the VR training tool to interviews with vineyard trainers and pruners, the research will provide an opportunity for the people who might be using the tool in their everyday work to engage with the particular technology, and to discuss the various ways it might shape or support their everyday work. These interviews will support the project’s technology developers in becoming more responsive to the experiences and needs of these possible end users. While understanding changing work patterns in response to a single technology cannot provide insights into the future of agricultural work in general, such an inquiry can provide invaluable empirical insights and opportunities for possible end-users to become directly involved in discussions on technology design and how they imagine themselves within a more automated future. Such an inquiry distinguishes this research from a usability study, which tends to confine discussions to pre-determined technical metrics. As the experiences of agricultural trainers and workers are often not included in the design of new agritech, this research will contribute important empirical findings to discussions of the future of agricultural work and the inclusion of agricultural trainers and workers in the co-design of new technologies that will shape their lives and livelihoods.


12:20pm - 12:40pm 

FOLDED & UNFINISHED: DATA, TEMPORALITY AND EVERYDAY AGRO-ENVIRONMENTAL TOPOLOGIES
Matthew Henry, Chris Rosin and Sarah Edwards


Data is essential to governing those emerging matters of concern that confront the agro-environmental everyday. But data is no neutral intermediary. It disrupts, exposes and creates new social, economic, political and environmental possibilities, whilst simultaneously hiding, excluding and foreclosing others. Critical data scholars have become attuned to the role of data in creating everyday worlds, and the need to develop critical accounts of the materialities, spatialities and multiplicities of data relationships. A key feature of this emerging work has been a developing understanding of the intricate topologies of data relationships and how these topologies reconfigure the spatial performances of everyday life. However, gaps exist within the ambit of critical data studies. In particular, a concern with spatial topologies has largely taken the temporal dimensions of data relations to be matters of fact. This paper explores temporality and data as a matter of concern through three lenses: infrastructuring, performativity and ferality. These three lenses speak to the entanglement of temporal relations in data infrastructures; the performance of time made possible through those infrastructures; and the ferality of data as it escapes the bounds of the temporal worlds it helps fashion.



Thursday November 25, 2021 11:20am - 12:40pm NZDT
C6

12:40pm NZDT

Lunch - Dining Hall
COVID protocols for morning/afternoon teas and lunches

Delegates are required to scan the QR code on entry to The Dining Hall (every time), wear masks, and once inside, ensure they are seated at a table (these are set up for the required distancing protocol). Delegates are not permitted to stand and mingle. Staff will serve platters of the menu items to the tables, and there will be tea/coffee stations set up. Delegates will need to follow instructions of the staff in this regard – tables will be invited up one by one to get their tea/coffee. Physical distancing is also required while lining up for tea/coffee.

If you wish to bring a packed lunch, you are welcome to eat it in the Commerce Building foyer, or there are picnic tables if you prefer to eat outside.


Thursday November 25, 2021 12:40pm - 2:00pm NZDT
Dining Hall - Lincoln University

2:00pm NZDT

Room C1 - Keynote: Professor Bronwyn Hayward
Chair: Associate Professor Ruth McManus
Sponsored by BRANZ

Bronwyn Hayward (MNZM) is a Professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations and Director of The Sustainable Citizenship and Civic Imagination Research group at the University of Canterbury. Her research focuses on the intersection of sustainable development, youth, climate change and citizenship. Bronwyn is a Coordinating Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR6 report (Cities, Settlements and Key Infrastructure) and was a lead author for the 2018 IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5o (Sustainable Development, Poverty Eradication and Reducing Inequalities). She is co-primary investigator with University of Surrey's ESRC funded Centre for Understanding Sustainable Prosperity, and leads the CYCLES Children and Youth in Cities Lifestyle Evaluation Study in seven cities around the world.

Speakers

Thursday November 25, 2021 2:00pm - 3:00pm NZDT
C1

3:00pm NZDT

THANKYOUS and CONFERENCE CLOSE – Dr Carolyn Morris
Thursday November 25, 2021 3:00pm - 3:10pm NZDT
C1