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Thursday, November 25 • 11:20am - 12:40pm
Room C5 - Parallel Session Four: Critiques of Business & Hard Science

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Chair: Roslyn Kerr

11:40am - 12:00pm
GENERATING DELIBERATE AND MEANINGFUL IMPACT FROM BUSINESS EVENTS IN NEW ZEALAND: GOING BEYOND THE ECONOMIC
Trudie Walters


The economic value of business events is well-known – delegates spend more per day than leisure visitors, may stay longer than the duration of the event, and return to holiday with family or friends. However, attention has more recently turned to the social value of business events. Research has found that conference attendance, for example, has consequences for career progression and research collaboration. Friendships formed at business events contribute to improved well-being, retention of staff in the profession, and more creativity and innovation in the sector. There is increasing interest amongst the events industry in how to create more social value, but this area is largely overlooked within academia.

This presentation shares insights from the Tourism New Zealand Conference Impact Aotearoa (CIA) programme, designed to generate deliberate and meaningful impact from business events hosted in New Zealand. The programme seeks to extend past the traditional economic perspective on ‘value’ and seeks to maximise the value of business event delegates across the other three pillars of well-being: social, cultural and natural. The presentation reports on my experiences of working with four conferences in the CIA programme to deliver impact beyond the economic and contribute to engagement, well-being and sustainability in New Zealand.


12:00pm - 12:20pm
WHEN I WENT ‘WOW’: WAYS OF SEEING AND ROUTES INTO THE HOMEOPATHIC PROFESSION
Kevin Dew & Monika Clark-Grill


Homeopathy, along with many other alternative therapies, has come under severe attack from apologists for orthodox medicine. Given the cultural authority of medicine, what then provides the impetus for people to take up homeopathy as a clinical practice? This paper addresses this question in the context of homeopathic practice in New Zealand. Five focus groups were conducted with 22 homeopaths in five cities. The study found that participants were not drawn to homeopathy by its philosophy, but through witnessing in themselves, their family, friends, or animals, the positive effects of homeopathy, commonly after negligible success from conventional medicine. For many participants, all of whom were women, the opportunity to study homeopathy occurred when they were the primary carers of children, with homeopathy providing a possibility for a change in work trajectories. Many participants had previous occupations inside the conventional health system. Central to the appeal of homeopathy as a subaltern practice in New Zealand is the often dramatic impact of witnessing the effects of the therapeutic modality, which is conceptualised as analogous to an ‘event’ that tears at the fabric of the everyday.


12:20pm - 12:40pm 

THE PHENOMENON SIMONE BILES: COMBINING SOCIAL, MENTAL, AND PHYSICAL ATHLETIC SUCCESS
Roslyn Kerr & Natalie Barker- Ruchti


There is increasing awareness of the abusive culture that dominates high performance sport and the severe detrimental effects it can have on athlete wellbeing. Linked to this concern is a lack of understanding of the social factors that contribute to athletic performance, with the majority of research concerning high performance success being dominated by the physical sciences. In this study, we aim to improve our understanding of the social conditions that produce both athlete wellbeing and high performance success through focusing on the most successful gymnast of all time: Simone Biles. Anecdotal evidence suggests Biles has experienced a very different pathway from many high performance athletes in terms of her coach’s style of coaching and the social relationships Biles was able to cultivate. Further, as her performance at the Tokyo Olympic Games suggests, she has been able to develop an independent self, which among others, allowed her to prioritise her wellbeing. This presentation will introduce preliminary results of a case study examination of Simone Biles as an example of how high performance sport might be performed more sustainably.


Thursday November 25, 2021 11:20am - 12:40pm NZDT
C5